Archives: Exhibitions

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7 Artists

7 Artists

Julian Knap (painting in the gallery during April, Monday to Friday 11.30 – 2.30)

Work on Julian’s ‘Rome’ painting started in March 2021. This ‘still in progress’ painting will be available to view along with a selection of limited edition prints of his previous cityscapes. Julian’s first work, ‘A Trek Through Wellington’ took 3 years to paint, his last took over 4 years.

Job Klijn

“I use as much recycled material as I can and my process involves a lot of adding and subtracting of layers, texture, soil, thinning, scraping, burning, swiping etc, until there is a feeling of emotive ‘rightness’. The result often being a multitude of trial and errors”.

Bill Burke

“For me it has always come down to the drawing – I’ve spent decades at it.” And true to his word, beneath every one of Bill’s exuberant paintings, is a carefully thought out, skilfully executed under-drawing. “It’s where I work things out – composition, lighting, perspective.”

Rachael Errington

“I’m endlessly fascinated with using different techniques to recreate colours. I love been able to squash colour across a surface”. “My work is emotive, it is all I ever want to do.”

Shane Hansen

‘The detail of my mahi, is in it’s simplicity. Keeping details to a minimum to achieve an image of high impact, depth and meaning, is a challenge, but I feel the work is stronger because of it. The term less is more, is definitely the case with my work and it doesn’t mean it is less meaningful.”

Marc Hill

“I formulate the paint from pure powder pigments, some of which are extremely rare and date back to the 1870’s. In Emergence, these pigments help create the experience of illusory shifting moods.” “The canvas is repurposed from 1960s theatre backdrops. The fine herringbone weave and aged distemper paint form the initial undertone and patina which causes it to behave quite differently from its sterile modern equivalent.”

The Art of Dr. Seuss

The Art of Dr. Seuss project offers a rare glimpse into the artistic life of this celebrated American icon and chronicles almost seven decades of work that, in every respect is uniquely, stylistically, and endearingly Seussian. Collectors can see and acquire authorised estate edition lithographs, serigraphs, and sculptures reproduced from Ted’s original drawings and paintings.

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Kevin Dunkley

MARK THIS DATE IN YOUR CALENDER

We are pleased to invite you to Kevin’s new exhibition

‘ARE WE THERE YET?’

‘Never in the history of plastic spoons and Stanley Street has nostalgia brought back so many memories.’

Opening Thursday 2nd May 4.30 – 6.30

rsvp [email protected]

Now constructing with a fluency that reflects accumulative years of dedication to paint, Kevin revisits subjects and themes from the last 19 years.

Nostalgia remains the inspiration for Kevin’s paintings, recalling and recording childhood and youthful holidays traveling from Wainuiomata to anywhere north. In this latest collection Kevin ruminates on his work to date, considering his career thus far, and has travelled a far more personal journey.

Expect to find his familiar subjects, for instance caravans, beaches, barbeques, country roads and of course a ‘4 Square’ or two.

Kevin’s first painting was for a friend, and of all things, simply to cover a hole in the wall. Although Kevin considered the painting ‘bloody awful’ this rather unorthodox start had him hooked.

From the early naïve works of his first showcase, in a Wellington pub on a Friday night, to his first gallery exhibition, ‘Are We There Yet?’, his brush work and colours have become refined. The journey continues, Kevin is always striving to cultivate growth and despite sell out exhibitions, he remains grounded “I started out not having a clue what to do or how to do it, but by experimenting I have found a style I enjoy, and I have become part of my paintings.”

Kevin’s career before painting was freelancing in advertising.

 

Simon Kerr

We are pleased to invite you view Simon Kerr’s latest exhibition:

‘If You Want Meat Go To The Butcher’

As the former leader of the notorious Hole in The Wall Gang and infamous for escaping custody six times, Simon Kerr is an unlikely candidate for an artist and yet his life experiences have influenced the narrative found in his paintings. “My art is two things – a narrative of my personal journey and the other part of it is my observation of the world along that journey.”

Simon didn’t start painting until his last prison sentence, served at Northland Region Corrections Facility from 2011 to 2015 and although his work is reminiscent of artists like Basquiat, his lack of formal training, or even knowledge of such painters, has meant that Simon has developed his own style.

Simon’s journey from a career criminal to an exhibiting artist is an interesting narrative, but as with all our artists, the resume only takes you so far. The work itself is what matters and Simons invigorating work sits well with the gallery collection.

enquiries: [email protected] 

George Arevshatov

NEW WORK BY GEORGE AREVSHATOV

Download Exhibition Catalogue

New Zealand Birds
There is something deeply appealing about George’s birds, as they perch in a light and dark abstract paint space. Their life force is captured by assured brushstrokes of intense colour further adding to the contrast of shadow and light.

Famous People Portraits.
What better way to display your talent than to accurately capture a likeness, in a portrait, of someone that everyone would recognize. Portraits of famous people allow us to stand face to face with an icon, a person, we would be unlikely to meet. Fame brings familiarity and therefore expectation on our part, leaving little room for flaws. George’s portraits do not disappoint.

George Arevshatov was born in Tbilisi, Georgia. He moved to New Zealand in 2009 with his partner and is employed at Weta FX as a Senior Texture artist.

enquiries: [email protected]

Ilya Volykhine

‘Table of Contents’ – Ilya Volykhine

Ilya Volykhine Catalogue 2023

The humble table is a ubiquitous object that is often overlooked. But for me, the table is a source of endless fascination. It is a place where we come together to eat, to talk, to laugh, and to cry. It is a place where we share our lives with others.

 

In my paintings and works on paper, I explore the many different ways in which the table can be used and experienced. I see the table as a symbol of connection, community, and tradition. It is a place where we can be ourselves and where we can feel truly at home.

 

I am excited to share my new exhibition, Table of Contents, with the people of Wellington. I hope that my paintings will inspire viewers to reflect on the important role that the table plays in our lives.

enquiries: [email protected]

Susan Webb

Susan Webb returns for her first exhibition since October 2015

‘It Ain’t All Peaches and Cream’
Susan Webb

“It has been a pleasure to do the drive-and-fly around the motu of late and allow my brain once more to take in NZed’s extraordinary high altitude light.

The skies since the Tongan undersea volcano massive, massive eruption 15 January 2022 have magnified sunrises and sunsets.” – Susan Webb

enquiries: [email protected] 

 

Rachael Errington

We are pleased to invite you to view
 Rachael Errington’s solo show

Rachael’s tree paintings have taken on a life of their own. Intricate textures of bark created with modelling paste and other ‘secret’ compounds are tactile and 3-dimensional. The colours are the depth and warmth of autumn and the fresh lime green tones of spring. Fascinated by the ever-changing play of filtered light Rachael encourages the viewer to step into the woods, to smell it, to feel it and to be soothed.

While formulating the structure and colours of the work in her mind Rachael freely admits to spending quite a lot of time staring at a blank canvas.

“I’m endlessly fascinated with using different techniques to recreate colours. I love been able to squash colour across a surface”.

While Rachael states that Edgar Degas and Gustav Klimt are artists that have influenced her, she constantly draws inspiration while walking and hiking and from her extensive photography collection, to date over 5000 images.

“My work is emotive – It is all I ever want to do. “

enquiries: [email protected]

John Badcock

John Badcock

SELECTED WORKS STILL ON SHOW

enquiries: [email protected]

John Badcock is a well recognised name in New Zealand Art. He is from an extremely artistic family, and first began painting with his father, Douglas Badcock, in Queenstown over 50 years ago. He has been working as a professional artist for more than 35 years and has had numerous public and dealer gallery exhibitions.

His works are held in major public collections including The Hocken Library, Dunedin, Christchurch Art Gallery, New Zealand Portrait Gallery, Wellington, Aigantighe Art Gallery, Timaru and Andersons Park, Invercargill. He also has work in the Sackman Corporation collection in New York.

John’s artwork is identifiable by his heavily applied and beautifully sculptured use of rich oil paint on board. These rich textural paintings illustrate the skill of John’s ability to form fields of grasses and seeding flowers, stunning portraiture or the bold form of intricate Victorian architecture from paint that is almost “falling off the canvas”.

John has numerous awards to his name from throughout New Zealand and in 2007 he was selected for the Archibald Salon des Refuses exhibition in Sydney, Australia.

Early in 2015 John was included in the top 10 Great Artists from New Zealand list, compiled by theculturetrip.com and joins the other great artists such as Bill Hammond, Jason Greig and Kushana Bush

Eleanor Somerset

Eleanor Somerset

‘Beyond the Horizon’

enquiries: [email protected]

I am constantly drawn to the landscape which tells the story of places and seasons, and is a connection for us all, wherever in the world we are. These paintings are my response to that connection, creating what is in essence a tribute to the memory of a place. They can be fleeting or more constant, reflecting the changing lines, shapes and colours of the land.

For this exhibition I have painted on Belgian linen which is an exciting departure for me. Painting on linen enables me to draw on the foundations of classical techniques in a contemporary context. In a sense, my paintings carry the weight of that tradition, while  capturing my own moment, my own landscape, my own sky.

The linen has a warmth to it, the weave reflecting the light and colours of the flax. Its richness comes through, infusing the pigment and deepening forms. The weight and texture of the linen, its organic roughness, and imperfections, are part of what makes the fabric so beautiful. It’s a bit like the creative process itself; working with what you have to create something new. I’m not so much painting on linen as with it.

“I found I could say things with colour and shape that I couldn’t say any other way – things I had no words for” – Georgia O’Keeffe

 

‘Adage’ Eric Desiles

‘Adage’ 

As a circus trained acrobat himself, French sculptor Eric Desiles has an intimate knowledge of the human body, form and movement. He was inspired to capture split seconds of motion and emotion, using his experience as a performance artist to create timeless figures in bronze

Exhibitions Gallery, 20 Brandon Street, Wellington

enquiries: [email protected] 

 

Reviews For Real

‘Reviews for Real’ 

Sacha Lees

enquiries [email protected] 

New Zealand, Aotearoa is a place of unparalleled natural beauty. Every year, billions of dollars are spent promoting New Zealand’s spectacular natural features as ‘once in a lifetime, must see.’ Our glistening coastlines, majestic alpine ranges and lush farmlands are lauded internationally, featuring in major cinematic films. New Zealand endures as a ‘bucket-list’ holiday destination.

When researching on my computer to find ‘the perfect’ Aotearoa spot for a holiday, I stumbled across the Five-Star-Review feature on Google that records opinions of popular destinations. The reviews scrutinise tourist destinations in the same manner we might review a product – a smartwatch, a scented candle, a vacuum cleaner. While sometimes hilarious, the lowest star reviews reflect an attitude towards our natural environment of disposability and entitlement. It reduces our whenua to mere commodity, a space provided solely for our entertainment. Reviewers, worryingly, appear not to care about the environmental, the cultural or historical values of each destination – rather what pleasure they might extract from it.

Discovery of the Google-Five-Star-Review feature caused me to ponder the meaning, power, and significance of these appraisals. It also provided a creative spark.

I digitally illustrated various idyllic tourist destinations, reimagining them as circa-1920’s Tourism New Zealand advertising posters, adopting similar font, layout, and the prevailing style of the time. I searched for the lowest star Google reviews for each destination and set comments – humorous, disparaging, enraged – against each ‘idyllic spot’ to create an idiosyncratic juxtaposition that elevates these promotional placards to a commentary on culture and various attitudes to the environment in a contemporary context.

I hope the result might encourage people to reconsider their relationship with the environment and pay more respect to the cultural or heritage value of each destination.

Sacha Lees is a multi-award-winning Artist based in Wellington, New Zealand. Her commercial work features on celluloid, in publications, on stamps and coins. Sacha’s Fine Art is held in prestigious collections world-wide and can be found in leading New Zealand galleries.

 

The Secret Keeper Sculpture

We are pleased to invite you and your guests to ‘The Secret Keeper’

Catherine Daniels’ story of childhood trauma

A special thanks to Chris and Kathy Parkin for their wonderful support!

This exhibition is about my childhood trauma and sexual abuse. It wasn’t until I was nearly 50 that I realised my secrets had made me sick. As I started to un fold the layers of history through words, many of them in metaphorical form, I joined a writers’ group which supported me in my journey through the complexities of understanding my own mental health issues.

One day I couldn’t write so I decided to make a sculpture to portray what I couldn’t say in words. That day, ‘The Secret Keeper’ was born. Over the last five years I have created 49 sculptures to portray the emotions I could never verbalise out loud. I have also written and published a book of metaphors called “The Secret Keeper” which will be for sale at the exhibition.

I commissioned multi award winning photographer Esther Bunning to portray the visual imagery within the book so the reader feels and senses the disassociation often attached with childhood trauma. We have produced a range of large canvases and metal prints that are available as artworks for sale which has brought another important facet to this project. I have a storytelling video by Terry Wreford Hann showing the sculptures and incorporating words from the book and some footage of me creating the sculptures. This gives the viewer an inside look at how the sculptures have been created.

The never-ending cycle needs to be broken

 

The Secret Keeper Photography

We are pleased to invite you and your guests to ‘The Secret Keeper’

Catherine Daniels’ story of childhood trauma

A special thanks to Chris and Kathy Parkin for their wonderful support!

This exhibition is about my childhood trauma and sexual abuse. It wasn’t until I was nearly 50 that I realised my secrets had made me sick. As I started to un fold the layers of history through words, many of them in metaphorical form, I joined a writers’ group which supported me in my journey through the complexities of understanding my own mental health issues.

One day I couldn’t write so I decided to make a sculpture to portray what I couldn’t say in words. That day, ‘The Secret Keeper’ was born. Over the last five years I have created 49 sculptures to portray the emotions I could never verbalise out loud. I have also written and published a book of metaphors called “The Secret Keeper” which will be for sale at the exhibition.

I commissioned multi award winning photographer Esther Bunning to portray the visual imagery within the book so the reader feels and senses the disassociation often attached with childhood trauma. We have produced a range of large canvases and metal prints that are available as artworks for sale which has brought another important facet to this project. I have a storytelling video by Terry Wreford Hann showing the sculptures and incorporating words from the book and some footage of me creating the sculptures. This gives the viewer an inside look at how the sculptures have been created.

The never-ending cycle needs to be broken

The Art of Dr Seuss

A TRIBUTE TO THE POWER OF PERSPECTIVE

Lonely © shadow.png
LONELY

The Art of Dr. Seuss

Mixed-Media Pigment Print on Archival Canvas, Authorized Estate Edition

Image Size: 24” x 30.5” with additional canvas border
Limited Edition of 850 Arabic Numbers
99 Patrons’ Collection, 155 Collaborators’ Proofs, 5 Hors d’Commerce, 2 Printer’s Proofs

 

Just one word was needed to define his thoughts. The painting speaks the remaining volumes.

“In the quiet of the night, delving deep into his personal reflections, Dr. Seuss captured the essence of solitude.

“Dr. Seuss seemed to understand that a change in perspective can dramatically influence our behavior and create endless opportunities for growth.

How we view an object, concept, or situation shapes our personality and our world view.

Theodor Seuss Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss) seemed to understand this and changed the world through his writings and illustrations by showing us how “perspective” can dramatically influence our behavior.

We saw this in Green Eggs and Ham when Sam’s friend finally tried the dish he thought he would not like.

We saw this in The Grinch when the Grinch’s heart grew three sizes upon finally “seeing” the true spirit of the holidays.

And now, as new works are released from Ted Geisel’s private collection, we see his perspective evermore clearly across the range of his Secret Art.


THE MIDNIGHT PAINTINGS

Dr. Seuss’s private artworks have been called his “Midnight Paintings” for good reason. They were mostly done in the loneliest hours of the night when the pressures of his day had subsided. In that quiet darkness, he would retire to his easel to see what inspiration might unfold. Those moments were not about being lonely, but rather about great artistic freedom flourishing in the stillness of the night.

Perspective is everything, and he seemed to harness that idea to create one of the 20th century’s most important and timeless bodies of work.

“Dr. Seuss’s late night painting sessions, alone in his studio,
were not about being lonely, but instead were about
great artistic freedom flourishing in the stillness of the night.

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